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25.2.14

Where do ideas come from?

It is possible that this entire adventure began when I read Erik Larson's In the Garden of Beasts.  My son and I were on a kick of reading narrative non-fiction, so I picked it up.  For what ever reason, I have always been fascinated by the 1920s, 30s and 40s.  I was doing a little research on my grandfather and his life in the late 20s.  I had written a few short stories, but was hitting a lot of brick walls when I looked for fact to balance the fiction.

In the meantime, my niece was diagnosed with asthma.  After a visit and seeing how tired her poor little nose was of the constant contact with paper tissue, I went looking for dainty hankies.  A dear friend offered me a few and I greedily took them.  There was just one problem, the monogram was an F, not a B.  So I decided to give the handkerchiefs a new life with a story.  As I sat down to write the story, deep in Larson's world of Germany, I began to write the story of an evacuee.  It was quite short and just explained how she would be in possession of a handkerchief with the wrong monogram, but Millie, my main character was born on those pages.

I tried to continue the work on the American Depression Era, but Millie wouldn't relent.  She is one of those needy children the Indigo Girls sing about.  And so, here I am writing her story.  This is it in a nut shell:

An unfeeling mother, Nazi bombs and youth conspire to expel Millie from her beloved London.  Remote country life brings only a string of tedious days until she discovers a British secret weapon and her own special gifts.  Combined, they bring Millie the family she never knew she needed and an end to the war.

On my trip to London, I found her house, the paths she would have walked and the city she adored.    What I found out while I was there was remarkable!  Now for the continued writing and research.

By the way, if any of you have every wondered about how Hitler rose to power or how we as Americans responded to that rise, you should check out this book.  If you have a kiddo who is interested in the topic, it is a curious look at that time, through the eyes of the newly appointed American Ambassador to Germany.  It is a hard truth, but any advanced reader 7th grade and up would be able to sort it out.

1 comment:

  1. This is all very exciting, Melissa! I can't wait to read your book and I find the journey super thrilling! Can't wait to check out this book. Maybe Ben can still be a part of the club from far away. :)

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